Embroidering Knitting - part 3

25th September 2012

In part three of our masterclass series on embroidering knitting, Jane Crowfoot explains the embroidery stitches Backstitch, Threaded Backstitch and Pekinese Stitch.

Embroidered cardigan

Last time we covered Running Stitch, Threaded Running Stitch and Whipped Running Stitch. In the first part of our masterclass series on embroidering knitting, Jane Crowfoot explained how you can embroider an existing piece of knitwear.

backstitchBack stitch

This is another common stitch and is one that many people use for putting together knitted or crochet garments. Back stitch is useful for creating outline details and lines.

With the right side facing, bring the needle through from the back. Insert the needle through the work from front to back a short distance along to the left. (Keep this distance uniform, perhaps one or two stitches – we have used one stitch). * Bring the needle through the work from back to front the same distance along to the left. Continue by inserting the needle through from front to back at the point where the last stitch emerged; rep from *. .

Threaded backstitchThreaded back stitch

Work back stitch as above. Using first contrast colour: Work as for threaded running stitch, working the second contrast colour in the gaps left between by the threaded stitches made in the first contrast colour.

 

Pekinese stitchPekinese stitch

When working Pekinese stitch try to think of each backstitch as one of a pair. One Pekinese stitch is made using one pair of back stitches.

Work back stitch as above. Using a contrast colour: With the right side facing, bring the needle through from the back. Keeping the needle at the front of the work, insert the needle through the second sewn stitch of the first pair, vertically from top to bottom and pull through. Insert the needle through the first stitch of the pair vertically from bottom to top and pull through.

* Insert the needle through the second sewn stitch of the following pair vertically from top to bottom and pull through.

Insert the needle through the first stitch of the pair vertically from bottom to top and pull through; repeat from *.

The final post in this masterclass series on embroidering your knitting will take you through Interlacing Stitch, Couching and Lock Stitch.

Jane Crowfoot, knitting expertAbout our expert

Jane Crowfoot is one of the UK’s leading knitting experts and author of the book Finishing Techniques for Hand Knitters (Search Press, £9.99) Find out more about Jane at janeknits.blogspot.com and www.janiecrow.co.uk

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